We need a more inspiring vision of Britain Beyond Brexit

 “In this present crisis, government is not the solution to the problem.  Government is the problem.”  Ronald Reagan.

Never has Reagan’s famous Conservative aphorism been more pertinent.  As some of us have been warning for over a decade, it’s now clear that the debt crisis following the crash of 2008 has triggered a major crisis of political economy: a crisis of public trust and legitimacy in the relationship between power and wealth in our society, and the ability of traditional party politics and Governments to solve it.

A moment of National Renewal? Or managed decline?

Keynote speech to IPPR  14th November 2017

Having spent fifteen years as an entrepreneur before coming to Parliament, I’m from a world where the motto was simple…
 
never let a good crisis go to waste.
 
And it is a motto that is more relevant to our national life today than ever.

Embracing our future as a scientific superpower

Science is Britain's passport to the worldAs we consider a future outside the EU, we need to tackle one simple question: will this be a national identity crisis or a moment of profound renewal?

“Would I vote for Brexit again?”

In recent days, I have been increasingly asked “Would you vote for Brexit again?”

I believe that this is the wrong question.

Over 60% of my constituents voted in a Referendum to leave. My job is now to work hard to try and ensure Brexit works for the 48% as well as the 52% and doesn’t do what I feared it would do – make us poorer, deepen austerity, and see Britain turn its back on the world.

That’s why I’m working to ensure that Brexit becomes an inspiring moment of Renewal we can ALL look back on with pride. The real question is whether we can deliver a Brexit deal that’s worth supporting.

Where next for Conservative Renewal?

The Conservative party currently stands at a crossroads. The General  Election demonstrated the speed at which politics is changing and showed in the starkest terms how we must change with it.

A Conservative Capitalism worth fighting for

With our political order now under attack from the extremes of both left and right, a new battle of ideologies is reshaping our politics. Is it too late to restore trust in the political centre ground? 

The New Politics

Conservative Policy Forum Conference Speech at The Life Centre, Sale (Manchester) to Party Members.

Money, movement and markets - securing a Brexit deal

Having spent fifteen years working as an entrepreneur, and having served as a Business Minister, making sure the UK remains the global capital of enterprise is one of my central missions.

That's why I was delighted to appear on the Westminster Hour on Sunday, setting out my thoughts about the future direction of the Brexit negotiations.

During the programme, I highlighted the three key questions that we need to address as the negotiations continue, namely Markets, Movement and Money.

To listen to the interview, click here.

We Tories must shake off this hostility to business and embrace entrepreneurial capitalism

George W Bush famously said that “the problem with France is that they don’t have a word for entrepreneur”. 
 
In reality, the French have plenty of words for it, but as Emmanuel Macron has grasped, simply not enough actual entrepreneurs. Instead, they’re in London – now France’s fourth biggest city – escapees from the country’s self-defeating labour laws, drawn to London’s renaissance as a vibrant global city. 
 
De Gaulle’s famous dictum that it is hard to govern a country with 300 cheeses has been turned around: the recent revival of British cheese by entrepreneurs now means that the UK has more cheeses than France. (We are seemingly becoming less governable, too.) 

Introducing the Big Tent Ideas Fest

The turbulence of politics in the last few years – here in the UK and across the West – represents a serious challenge to the prevailing order of Western societies and economies.

Enterprise in the public sector is the way to end austerity

The shock of seeing Jeremy Corbyn successfully reap the benefit of a woeful election campaign has triggered a lot of soul searching amongst Conservatives. Rightly so. I believe we need to take a long hard look at why the campaign went so wrong, and the real reasons we lost a number of key voter groups at this election.

One Purpose. One Party. One Nation.

'It was a privilege to speak to the Tory Reform Group recently to consider the Conservative response to the Election. 

You can read my speech here, where I analyse what went wrong and how our future success is in the hands of a New Generation of Brits on the New Frontier of a New Global Age.

A New Deal for a New Generation

Why I believe the recent General Election is the final proof that a New Generation of 21stC Conservatives need to offer a New Deal for a New Generation.

MY WORK ON A MORE ENTERPRISING CONSERVATISM

Having spent fifteen years as an entrepreneur before coming to Parliament, one of my central missions as a Member of Parliament has been to champion the role of enterprise and business as the engine of our prosperity, as well as campaigning to make our public sector and Government work in a much more business-like manner.

This is a mission I have taken through my work as Government Life Science Adviser, Minister at the Business and Health departments and as Chair of the Prime Minister’s Policy Board and Chair of the Conservative Policy Forum.

As we look towards a future outside the European Union, this mission is more vital than ever. Fundamentally, we don’t just need a Government for enterprise, but a more enterprising Government.

This is an agenda I have set out in a range of articles over the last seven years (click here), and am taking forward with a new campaign this Parliament.

THE PEOPLE HAVE SPOKEN. WHERE DO WE GO FROM HERE?

Last Thursday the people spoke, here in Norfolk and across the country. To be returned to Parliament for the third time is a huge responsibility.

As we all know, during this campaign we heard some powerful grievances, complaints and concerns from the electorate – locally and nationally. I am determined that I, and the Conservative Party, listen, heed, and show we have acted on them.

That’s why this week I have decided this week to call for the new minority Conservative Government to adopt a fresh approach to the core challenges we face as a country:

Where is the mandate now? In Parliament. And why we need a Government that shows it’s listening...

The Daily TelegraphGeorge writes in the Daily Telegraph.

Brexit was supposed to be about Parliamentary sovereignty. But the electorate has given us an inconvenient answer. They have returned a hung Parliament.  Theresa May is right to see through her duty to provide a stable government. It is therefore the job of all of us as democratically elected Parliamentarians to try and represent the will of the people we serve.

One thing is clear: we couldn’t reject the results of the EU Referendum, and nor can we reject the results of a General Election explicitly called to secure a mandate for Brexit.

George in Westminster

 

 

 

Big Tent Ideas Festival

Politics is undergoing a tectonic shift. That’s why this year I launched the first-ever Big Tent Ideas Festival, aiming to tackle the most difficult policy challenges we face. Bringing together over a hundred thinkers across the political spectrum, we discussed new ideas on everything from Brexit to intergenerational fairness, centred around three main themes: Politics, Society and Economy.

The Big Tent Ideas Festival is part of the new Capital Ideas Foundation, and will be setting off round the country over the next twelve months as the forum for the best new ideas in public policy. Click below and join us.

Read more:

Publications

5th November 2017 Let's make science funding part of the aid budget – and help British tech save the world by George Freeman | The Telegraph


4th October 2017 Conservatives need to give people a vision they can believe in by George Freeman | The Times


1st October 2017 How do we Tories turn this around? Five ideas for conference by George Freeman | The Telegraph